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. they ran away to the natchez-mississippi area, the territory. and lived together and later claimed they were married. campaign, it became a real issue and jackson never got over it because he said it ultimately. all her life, she was embarrassed by it. she was a pioneer woman, she a pipe, a corn cob pipe. and was a very excellent plantation manager. the public side of things, no. and she was very, very hurt by it. now, judge overton, the best riend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of the not being married because they did remarry. advised them to marry when jackson became famous and that tennessee. the whole detail. he gets up. goes to mississippi, to natchez. say, they were married. he wouldn't go any further than that. >> what did andrew jackson do the rest of his term? two terms, really? as far as the first lady? hostess? wife's niece for the second administration. he died in the second administration. she was popular. but she left over the flutter of the margaret o'neill scandal of very loose he -- a morals -- known for loose morals. he married a member of the th
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
dead. >> and moving up the gulf coast to gulfport mississippi church goers gathered in the building on the building's steps as the church became an island to the massive flooding in the mississippi streets the high waters also stranded drivers and flooding homes and businesses. one man who was responding to the rising flood watters says thinks the worse in 20 years adding even hurricane katrina back in 2005 didn't cause anything like the flooding they are seeing right now. we have been having some mild temperatures here lately mike masco but you say things are changing. >> it could be a whole lot worse. look what's going on to the west. this is pretty easy the forecast. the only issue this morning i could see happening is is a little fog. north and west of the city out in frederick hagerstown some of the visibilities coming down to five miles zero visibility 10 miles a little patchy fog and it's into the upper 50s north of the beltway close to 70 downtown and 60. s along the bay -- 60s along the bay front. we expect scattered showers this afternoon. it's not a downpour or washout bu
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
out of gulf port, mississippi. 6 inches of rain leaving some people surrounded waist deep in water. >> it didn't get that heavy during katrina. >> the high waters stranded drivers. nothing like that here. you do say changes are coming? >> yes. >>> we have some dense fog out there, an advisory until 10:00. the areas of fog will start to dissipate around 9:00 this morning. that's going to leave us with lots of sunshine in the forecast. high pressure is going to build in through the day, do its thing. you can see this stationary front. the focal point of the showers, you can see that just off the coast of the carolinas right now. we will continue to stay dry towards tomorrow and that's when the change moves in. seasonal this morning. we should be at 65 degrees for the time of the year. that's what we're getting in glen burnie this morning. 64 mount eerie and 64 northville, mar dell springs at 63 degrees. fortunately we don't need the rain so that's good news that it's not picking up on a lot for today or even tomorrow. then we will start to see changes coming for the end of the week a
. >> the former senate majority leader trent lott is in a mississippi hospital this morning recovering from surgery. the republican was admitted to the hospital after suffering a ruptured appendix. he's in fair condition. expected to recover. 71. he's a lawyer, lobbyist and has a home and office in the jackson area. >> some news from the social scene this morning, there is word that former d.c. mayor is dating the widow of steve jobs. the "washington post" report that they met at a education conference in 2011 and bonded and shared their passion for education reform. sources tell the post-the relationship blue cross solid into a, quote, budding romance in january the same time that he and his wife announced their separation. they're honoring prince george. >> they have silver and gold plating and denominations of 25 cents, $5 and $20. the design featured variety of baby-themed engraves. collector kits. prices range from 25 to $250 in canada. >> 4:57, 75 degrees out there. >> still ahead, that man hunt that started in california has now taken a dangerous turn. what police are now saying abou
-american. in the crowd jesse jackson and mayoron berry.ry. >> let freedom ring from mississippi from every mountainside. >> while images resonate fromm that day in august when dr. king gave his iconic smeech organizers and participants wila hoping it will be a catalyst for more advances on the job front, immigration reform, more advances with voting rights. >> we can't improve our voting laws. >> we have to get the changes on capitol hill. it's time for that to end, ladies and gentlemen.en. i ask you to join with me in that fight! [cheers and applause]laus >> realizing how far we've come as a nation from the segregated buses, lunch counters and schools from the 50s and 60s you have only to talk about -- >> it was a lot of racism. blacks weren't allowed with the whites. they barely could do anything.tn >> it's important to me because martin luther king was like a mentor to me like coming up in school and i like -- like him ii have a dream that some day we all can come together evenve though we're not all the way there but on our way. >> that was fox 5 karen grayra houston reporting. this week's events i
they were going to do some things that they previously would never have done. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every senatorto cast a ballot. leahy is doing that. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom
and particularly the right to vote to people of color in mississippi. i hadn't -- i didn't know him well but i had covered him on a fairly regular basis. and when he was assassinated in an especially cowardly and despicable way, i was tipped to the shooting and we were the first people covering it, news people at the scene. so i knew medgar and had met his family before. i had met his brother at the airport and we formed a bond which lasts to this day, i'm happy to say. i've always had a bond with medgar's family partly because i know firsthand, i bore witness to how heroic his efforts were to bring freedom and justice in the darkest corners of mississippi at a bad time. by the way, it's little noted nor very often remembered that the march on washington for which dr. king rightly became so famous was originally designed to be primarily a march in memory of medgar evers and what had happened to medgar evers. that got lost in the shuffle of the day as it developed and has been lost in the history and reporting since that time. >> well, dan rather, you have provided so much detail and illumination a
wife called 911. >> my has has been shot. >> mississippi stretched a mile -- what's your name? >> karla porter. >> do you know the person? >> no. i never seen him before before. he was black and he just came in the side door. i went out and he came in. >> police say her whole story is a lie. she master minded a plan to have her husband murdered. she even enlisted the help of several people, including her sister, brother and nephew to hire hit man walter bishop. >> bishop told police he was promised $9,000 by karla who only asked one question when it was over. >> she asked if he was dead. i said i guess. she okay. >> during a long interrogation with police karla porter broke down. during her tearful confession she claimed her husband mentally and physically abused her. >> i didn't want any of this to happen. i didn't. >> what happened, car karla? >> he was just being really mean. >> reporter: porter was the last of five conspirators to go to trial. the hitman was sentenced to life in prison. i'm mike schuh reporting live in towson. back to you. >> thank you. if porter is co
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
south through mississippi, alabama, georgia up into the carolinas. all of this has stayed south of us. to the north and west, clearer skies out here. we think and we are pretty sure overnight tonight, all of these clouds continue to track to the west. our skies clear overnight tonight. once the clouds clear overnight, there is going to be the chance for a little bit of fog forming out there. it doesn't look like it is that bad area wide. where we get fog forming it could be quite dense. keep that in mind for the first couple of hours. 66 overnight, winds out of the south 5-10. temperatures upper 80s, accuweather forecast, foggy spots in the morning, warm at noon. 88° is hot. we haven't had 88° in a while. 90 wednesday. that is going to stay with us through friday. the weekend looking pretty good. back to middle 80s. less humid and dry. >> welcome back august. >> let's head to brian who is standing by. >> critical new phase into investigation of governor bob mcdonnell. a young man charged with armed robbery tries to make a run for it in a maryland courthouse. never guess where poli
the plains. in the southeast more of that in mississippi, alabama, georgia and north florida. 91 in orlando on monday. tuesday, still similar for the southeast. that's where we stay unsettled. wake up with al weekdays at 5:30. what do you think about caffeine? we consume over two billion cups of coffee every week without a second thought. 5-hour energy has less caffeine than some starbucks coffees, plus it has vitamins and nutrients. it's simple... caffeine with vitamins and nutrients. it's the combination that makes it so great. before you make a decision, get the facts. try a sip and find out why so many people love 5-hour energy. laura's being healthy and chewing her multivitamin. with one a day vitacraves for women. it's a great-tasting gummy multivitamin designed for women with more calcium and vitamin d. it's gummies for grown-ups. one-a-day vitacraves for women. >>> all right. you may recall earlier this week kathie lee was brave enough -- no, you were brave enough. >> proud enough! >> brave to show up -- >> shorts i'm embarrassed by. >> this is a photo of her fanny pack outside of r
first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> no. i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating carson patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl oldest rookie, 2 years old. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chilo infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a certain in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl. he was shot dead by an fbi tack day cal agent, and this morning, his victim, 16-year-old hannah anderson is to be reunited with her fathe
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
rescues along the beach. the choppy surf driven by the winds. >>> southern mississippi is drying up after almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. cars stuck and fire crews having to come out to help all the people. officials there handed out stand bags to protect the homes at risk of being inundated with the water. >>> can you imagine this? people went to church. by the time they left, the parking lot was full. some of they had waded out to their cars. the water did eventually go down and they were able to head home. >> good gracious, this is incredible. not that we are blaming you, but we are looking for explanations. >> this is incredible. at this point, month after month. we started this trend of drenching the southeast in june. july, setting records. it is august and we are still talking about an incredible amount of tropical moisture. the influx into the south. you can see, this is the area we are watching. each day, that moisture got closer. combined with a stationary front, they brought together unbelievable amounts of rainfall. i want to show you how far over the average, alo
white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. thank you for watching. "hardball" starts right now. >>> a question of character. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? r
-old emmitt till was murdered by two white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now.
discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes. no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating cancer patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this case this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie, he's 28 years old, and after serving times for a crime he did not commit. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, his attitude is great. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chillow infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a search in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
to be a person that is helping the cause and not coming against it. >> you grew up in mississippi? >> i did. kelly, i am two generations short from maids and farmers. it's because of my father, the late reverend james thomas mcclowen, that my mother got to go to high school. he built the first black high school in mississippi, my town. we have a long way to go. my father worked heavily to help integrate schools in mississippi. but today we don't have a level playing field when it comes to education. today the new plantation is the prison system. we have more black males in the prison system. so with the hard work that my father did and by the way, he was assistant warden also in the prison where before my father got there, there were chain gangs. my father really believed that you could rehabilitate the criminal. so we have a long way to go with the inner city, with people now on welfare, more so than ever before. so we have equal opportunity. do we have equal access? >> jack gains, thank you. joe freeman, good friends of mine. thank you both. juan williams, always good to have you. angela,
of free four little girls in a birmingham church and the chicago teenager on vacation in mississippi. it is a new day 50 years later and a better day, but the day is not over. today struggle for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
that will swim up, they have been known to swim up to mississippi river. most say it is the mouth of the bay. one thing you don't need to be concerned is getting attacked by a shark in chesapeake bay. there are parts of the world, chesapeake bay, they are uncommon there >> reporter: you don't need to worry about going in the bay? >> with the frequency, number of bull sharks going on, very infrequent, not going to be a problem. >> reporter: were you surprised? >> it happened in 2001. couple of fisherman, caught them, turned up at the mouth of the potomac. typically a couple every year. this is something going on. chesapeake bay is a highway of fish coming in from the ocean. they are there for food just like these sharks are coming for food. they are full of stipe bass. >> reporter: they are not hunting people? >> they are looking for fish. >> reporter: if you see one, what should you do? >> if you are at the beach and see a large shark, it would be in your best interest to go to the pool. >> reporter: i am with you. [laughter]. >> we have 16 species of sharks in the lower bay. bay is important for
the mississippi, and these were all designed from large mural paintings that you can find in the rotunda of the capitol in washington. but these were only used on the very first series and were never used on notes after the 1880's. john: so this is all still "legal tender?" mark: all legal tender. everything the federal government has issued since 1861 still retains its legal tender status. however, all of these notes have a premium value to collectors and you wouldn't want to actually want to spend them. plus, i can't imagine if you took a large note into any store that anybody would be willing to accept it. they'd all think it was counterfeit. john: so a five dollar bill from this period could be worth as little and as much as what? mark: a note from a big city, from new york or philadelphia, might be worth as little as $25, $30, $40. notes from really rare towns, or territories, or places that are highly collected and very few notes available, could be worth upwards of tens of thousands of dollars. john: mark, they say it's only money, but to me this is a very special array of currenc
and freedom. working in mississippi delta, it was lonely. you against the sheriff sometimes by yourself and a handful of people registered to vote. it was a way to reenforce our beliefs this could happen in america. we never dreamed we would have an african-american president. even the district of columbia being elected officials. d.c. officials were appointed by the government. they didn't vote for mayor, city council, any of those things. the march changed washington and america for the better. >> thing that struck me, power of not feeling alone. >> a absolutely. in america, you need help. you have to convince a bunch of people whatever you believe in is important so they can help you make the change. that is what march in washington represented. from that we get '64 -- civil rights act and '65 voting rights act. as a result of this march, march on washington then montgomery march. >> i want you to speak about the importance of children and being part of the march? >> first time i went to jail i was a young man. i am pleased to say i am bringing three of my grandchildren with me. they
. and go back to mississippi, go back to north carolina. come here, but don't stay here. if you're going to change the nation, you've got to think states? and this is a question of what is happening in our local community. we will continue with coverage of this 50th commemoration of the march on washington when we return. [ bottle ] okay, listen up! i'm here to get the lady of the house back on her feet. [ all gasp ] oj, veggies -- you're cool. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! 'cause i'm re-workin' the menu, keeping her healthy and you on your toes. [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. i see you, cupcake! uh-oh! [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. ensure®. nutrition in charge™. [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. help keep teeth clean and breath play close.fresh and close. with beneful healthy smile food. with special crunchy kibbles and great taste... ...it's a happy way to a healthy smile. new beneful healthy smile food and snacks >>> i
to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like >> good morning.g y.ppy monda the sun breaking out with spotty showers possible. >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while the name sake of amelia earhart recreating her flight has explaining to do this morning. >> tracy morgan will give us a tour of his shark themed man cave. it's outrageous. first, these messages. to help pay for the road trip... before they earned 1% back on all purchases -- everywhere, every time -- and 2% back at the grocery store... even before earning 3% back on gas, w
will in mississippi. >> caller: how you do. >> host: go ahead, sir. >> caller: nice to talk with y'all today in '97, '98, i was in middle school in mississippi, and dr. carson came to speak to the students at the school, and i want to know was he making national tour to come visit different states and different schools? because we also had to read his book and write reports in middle school. and i want to know, was he planning on making those types of trips against. >> host: what did you think of dr. carson's visit when you were in middle school? >> caller: this is the reason i'm calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his book was he had an anger management problem, and so in my town, one of the things that have -- with the young people that is on the rise, anger, a lot of. the rivalries, aa rise in murders, so he found a way to channel the energy into direct it elsewhere, and so i wanted to know -- and that stood out his book believe i wrote on that topic but it was in 1997 and 1998. so i wonder can bring that back and circulate throughout the united states. >> host: can you tell the t
not doing anything, probably not saying anything. >> host: next call from robert in mississippi. >> caller: how are you doing? nice talking with you today. in 1997-1998 i was in middle schools in mississippi and dr. carson came to speak to students at the school and i wanted to know, was he making a national tour to come to different states in different schools because we also had to read his book and right research ports in middle school and i wanted to know was the plan on making those? >> host: what did you make of dr. carson's visit? >> this is the reason i am calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his boat was he had a name for a management problem and in my calendar that is one of the things with young people on the rise. and rising murders and found a way to challenge energy in directing and elsewhere and i wanted to know, that stuck out to me and i wrote on the topic but it was 97-98 so i don't remember but i want to know could he bring that back to the united states and young people? >> host: tell the temper story as well. >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i have be
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
's go down to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like this mor >>> thanks, bill. 8:07 now. taking a live look at the golden gate bridge, what you can make out here. i can tell you right now the low clouds are going to be with us for most of the daylplp in san francisco, but you will get gel a couple of bits ofÑi sunshine. most comfortable conditions right around the innerq xdbay. 75 for instance in oakland. then the heshu is on as we head through tomorrow climbing by 90s return wednesday. upper 90ed by >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while
. a slight risk of strong storms in the upper mississippi river valley. tomorrow, we're looking at more wet weather moving into the northeast, mid-atlantic states, the upper ohio river valley. western half of the country sunny and hot. the heat extends down near the gulf. down >>> good wednesday morning to you. i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are pretty comfortable out there right now. we are in the upper 50s, low 60s, live look at san jose shows you we still have clouds overhead. that natural ac moving all the way inland this morning, means a cooler afternoon. as a result, 70 degrees. today, in san francisco, a little bit cooler than average and temperatures are going to continue to drop off as we head through the nix couple of days. 87 degrees by thursday. up to 91 degrees on friday. >>> don't forget. get that weather any time you need it. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. >>> in the world of country music it does not get much bigger than dolly parton. she is a legendary singer and song writer and actress and entrepreneur. she shared big news with w
you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, i'm very pleased to be able to join my colleagues in wishing dave schiappa well in his next adventure in life, and knowing it will be successful, and also build upon his knowledge and experience here in the u.s. senate. i know his contributions will continue, and it will be a pleasure to continue to follow him in whatever career or noncareer or on vacation, whatever he chooses to do, will be happy and rewarding as has his tenure here in the united states senate. no one is more respected, more appreciated than david schiappa. so it is a sad day in many ways to see him leave, but a happy one to know that he's going to begin a new era, and we will watch him closely and stay in touch with him and continue to appreciate him for throughout his career and life. the presiding officer: the senator from wyoming. mr. barrasso: mr. president, i'd just like to add to the comments. in wyoming, we have what's called the code of the west. and while david schiappa may be the m
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